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Past Events

  • PICS Colloquium: Harish Vashishth (UNH)

    Towne 337

  • PICS Annual Conference

    Wu and Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall

    2017 PICS Conference
    Emergent Phenomena: Patterns, Function and Beyond
     
    October 5-6, 2017
    Wu and Chen Auditorium
    Levine Hall
    University of Pennsylvania
     
    Please register for this one-and-one-half day symposium focusing on the emerging computational and mathematical approaches associated with discovering new mechanisms, constraints, and convservation laws.
     
    Registration is FREE but REQUIRED
     
    External Speakers:

     

    Terry Sejnowski, UCSD
    Irmgrad Bischofberger, MIT
    Martin Bazant, MIT
    Simon Phillpot, University of Florida
    Ismaila Dabo, Penn State
    Michael Falk, Johns Hopkins
    Vladimir Pavlovic, Rutgers
     
  • PICS Colloquium: Weinan E (Princeton)

    Towne 337

    "Deep learning, deep modeling and deep algorithms"

     

    Weinan E
    Princeton Unversity

    Deep learning has proven to be a powerful tool in computer vision and

    other tasks in artificial intelligence. It has also opened up new exciting

    possibilities in scientific modeling.  I will discuss some of the applications

    of deep learning to molecular modeling and high dimensional partial

    differential equations.

  • PICS Colloquium: Yves Dubief (University of Vermont)

    Towne 337

    Title: Role of Elasto-Inertial Turbulence in Maximum Drag Reduction

    Abstract:Minute concentrations of high molecular weight polymers have one exceptional and one intriguing properties in turbulent ows. Polymers show exceptional friction drag reduction capability (up to 80%). Yet, since the discovery of polymer drag reduction in 1949, the community has been intrigued by the asymptotic state called maximum drag reduction or MDR that appears to be universal to all polymer molecules tested so far. Whilst the mechanism of the polymer drag reduction is now considered understood , MDR remains somewhat a controversial topic. One school of thought argues that the dynamics of MDR is of Newtonian nature, i.e. the building blocks are the fundamental instabilities that create streaks and vortices as observed in turbulence with Newtonian uids. Support for this theory stems from numerical simulations using a specic approach to stabilize the polymer eld governing equation. This approach is the achilles' heel of the claim that MDR is of Newtonian nature and an interesting tool to study MDR. Indeed this presentation will show that most simulations of polymer drag reduction have numerically ltered out a small scale phenomenon, called Elasto-Inertial Turbulence (EIT). EIT is a recently discovered new state of turbulence, where interactions between inertia and elastic eects can sustain a turbulence-like state in channel and pipe ows at Reynolds numbers much lower than the critical Reynolds at which Newtonian ows undergo a transition from laminar to turbulent state. The dynamics of EIT is an interesting and fairly unique inverse cascade system driven by the interplay of pressure, viscoelastic eects and velocity perturbations. EIT is found over a large range of Reynolds numbers from close to unity to well above critical, and not only in parallel, wall bounded shear ows but also in natural convection ows and surmised to exist in free shear ows. This presentation will introduce the second school of thought which argues that EIT is the cause of MDR. The relation between EIT and Elastic Turbulence (ET), a turbulent state discovered 17 years ago in inertia-less ows with curved streamlines, will also be discussed in the light of recent advances, in particular from Prof. Arratia, showing that ET may exist in parallel flows.

  • PICS Workshop: Introduction to Data Analysis in Python

    Towne 337

    Introduction to Data Analysis in Python
     
    Python is a great language for analyzing data, with easy access to machine learning toolkits, plotting libraries, and a great interactive data analysis system. In this course, I'll refresh you on the basics of programming in Python and we'll work through examples of loading, analyzing, and modeling data in Python. We'll cover modules such as pandas and scikit-learn, and go through the basic workflow of loading and analyzing data. The focus will be on writing short programs and working through the bugs you'll run into as a beginning Python data explorer, enabling you to apply your new skills to your own project after the workshop is over.
     
    Prerequisites:
    1. Basic (but not expert level) Python skills, such as those covered in an introductory Python workshop. You should feel comfortable writing loops, functions, and list comprehensions and working with basic data structures such as lists and dictionaries. However, if you're already very familiar with using Jupyter, pandas, and scikit-learn, you're probably too advanced for this class.
    2. A general interest in data analysis. Ideally, you'd have a small project you'd want to apply your newfound data analysis skills toward.
     
    About the instructor:
    Constantine Lignos (constantine.lignos@gmail.com) is a computational linguistics researcher who loves to hack in Python. He completed his PhD in Computer and Information Science at Penn and a post-doctoral fellowship at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, all while teaching Python as often as possible. He has taught Python Programming as a course at Penn (CIS192) and through informal workshops for graduate and undergraduate students, including three previous workshops with PICS. His favorite fact about Python is that before they fixed it, you could write "True, False = False, True" and pretty much break the universe.
     
    This will be a two day workshop on April 8 and 9, 10:00am-3:00pm each day. You must be able to attend both days.
     
    Registration for this event has closed, to join the waitlist please visit: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MXW8S2N
  • PICS Colloquium: TBD

    Towne 337

    TBD

  • PICS Colloquium: Alison Marsden (Stanford)

    Towne 337

    TBD

  • PICS Colloquium: TBD

    Towne 337

    TBD

  • PICS Colloquium: Christian Linder (Stanford)

    Towne 337

    Title:
    Beyond inf-sup: Stability estimates for multi-field variational principles by means of energetic conditions in incremental form
     
    Abstract:
    It is well known that mixed finite element methods have to satisfy certain criteria to provide solvability and stability. The latter criterion is, in the classical context of two-field saddle-point problems such as Stokes flow or quasi-incompressible elasticity, ensured by finite element types that satisfy the well-known inf-sup condition to ensure mesh-independent stability estimates. A number of finite element methods for novel multi-physics applications such as coupled Cahn-Hilliard-type flow in elastic media, extended phase-field models for fracture or topology optimization as well as gradient-extended plasticity models have a similar saddle-point structure. However, they correspond to a multi-field variational principle and only some of them suffer from similar instabilities. The question as to whether stability estimates are satisfied in these cases for standard discretizations and, if not, how conditions can be obtained that satisfy these estimates is particularly challenging.
  • PICS Colloquium: Erik Santiso (NC State)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Erik Santiso, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State
    Title: TBD
    Abstract: TBD

  • PICS Colloquium: Deyu Lu (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Deyu Lu, Ph.D., Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Title: First Principles Modeling of Electronic Excitations for Materials Applications
    Abstract: Electronic excitations are fundamental physical processes. Spectroscopic information, including absorption and emission spectra, from electron or photon probes is crucial for materials characterization and interrogation. When experimental data are supplemented and interpreted by first principles atomic modeling, a coherent physical picture can be established to provide physical insights into the intriguing structure-property-function relationship of functional materials. In this talk, the importance of the first principles modeling of electronic excitations is highlighted with three examples. In the first example, we investigated the oxygen 1s corelevel binding energy shift of bilayer silica films on Ru(0001) under different surface oxygen coverages in the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement. Our study revealed that the binding energy shift is an electrostatic effect caused by the interplay of the surface and interface dipole moments. In the second example, we raised the question on an inverse problem: how to solve the underlying local structural arrangements from observed spectral features? As a proof of principle, we adopted ab intio X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) modeling for structural refinement of local environments around metal impurities of a gold nano cluster. In the third example, we are motivated to develop a local representation of the microscopic dielectric response function of valence electrons, which is a central physical quantity that captures the many-electron correlation effects. Although the response function is non-local by definition, a local representation in real space can provide insightful understanding of its chemical nature and improve the computational efficiency of first principles excited state methods. This research used resources of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, which is a U.S. 

  • PICS Systems & Synthetic Bio Seminar: Leor Weinberger (UCSF)

    Towne 337

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    Speaker: Leor Weinberger, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    Title: Harnessing 'Noise' for Cell-Fate Control and Therapy

    Bio: Leor Weinberger is a Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California San Francisco and Senior Investigator at the Gladstone Institutes with a long-standing interest in quantiative viral dynamics and decision circuits. His work blends quantitative modeling with experimental molecular biology, and has won numerous accolades, including the NIH New Innovator Award, NIH Director's Pioneer Award, and is a Blavatnik Fellow, Sloan Fellow, and Pew Scholar. He obtained dual degrees in Biology and Physics from the University of Maryland, followed by a PhD in Biophysics from UC Berkley, after which he was a Lewis-Thomas Fellow at Princeton.

  • PICS Colloquium: Arthi Jayaraman (University of Delaware)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Arthi Jayaraman, Associate Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware
    Title: Using Theory and Molecular Simulations to Link Molecular Design to Morphology and Function in Polymeric Materials
    Abstract: In my research group we develop molecular models, theory and simulation techniques to connect molecular features of macromolecular materials, specifically polymers, to their morphology and macroscopic properties, thereby guiding synthesis and characterization of these materials for various applications in the energy and biomedical fields. In the first part of my talk I will present our work on polymer functionalized nanoparticles containing polymer nanocomposites. The overarching goal of this work has been to control spatial arrangement of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix (i.e. polymer nanocomposite morphology) so as to engineer materials with target mechanical or optical properties. One way to tailor polymer nanocomposite morphology is by functionalizing nanoparticle surfaces with polymers, and systematically tuning the composition, chemistry, molecular weight and grafting density of these grafted polymers. We have developed an integrated self-consistent approach involving Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (PRISM) theory and molecular simulations to study polymer grafted nanoparticles in polymer matrix, and to understand the effect of monomer chemistry, monomer sequence, and polydispersity, in the polymer functionalization on the effective interactions, and dispersion/assembly of functionalized nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. In this talk, I will present our recent results obtained using these computational techniques that agree with results from experiments by Prof. R. Krishnamoorti at University of Houston.1, 2

    In the second part of this talk I will present highlights of other recent atomistic and coarse-grained molecular simulation work we have been conducting to design a) polycations for DNA delivery (a collaboration with Prof. T. Emrick at UMass Amherst)3, b) novel oligonucleic acids (a collaboration with Prof. C. Bowman and Prof. S. Bryant at UColorado Boulder)4, and c) conjugated oligomers and polymers for organic electronics5, 6.

     

    1.               T. B. Martin, K. I. S. Mongcopa, R. Ashkar, P. Butler, R. Krishnamoorti and A. Jayaraman, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 137 (33), 10624-10631 (2015).

    2.               T. B. Martin, A. Jayaraman, Materials Research Express 3 (3), 034001 (2016).

    3.               A. F. Ghobadi, R. Letteri, S. S. Parelkar, Y. Zhao, D. Chan-Seng, T. Emrick and A. Jayaraman, Biomacromolecules 17 (2), 546-557 (2016).

    4.               A. F. Ghobadi and A. Jayaraman, Soft Matter 12 (8), 2276-2287 (2016).

    5.               L. Zhang, F. Liu, Y. Diao, H. S. Marsh, N. S. Colella, A. Jayaraman, T. P. Russell, S. C. B. Mannsfeld and A. L. Briseno, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136 (52), 18120-18130 (2014).

    6.               H. S. Marsh, E. Jankowski and A. Jayaraman, Macromolecules 47 (8), 2736-2747 (2014).

    EndFragment

     

     

     

  • PICS Python I Workshop

    Towne 337

    Instructor: Constantine Lignos, Ph.D.

    Description: Python is a great language for getting things done, with an approachable syntax and simple but powerful standard data structures. In this class, I will introduce the basics of Python syntax and we'll work through examples of writing programs that can read and write from files, perform basic data analysis, and do some simple simulations or games. The focus will be on writing short programs and working through the bugs you'll run into as a beginning Python programmer. You'll learn to write clean, readable, and fast Python code and how to understand the documentation so you can learn new things after the workshop is over and you can tackle your own projects. 

    Logistics: You will be required to bring your own computer. Lunch will be provided.

    Registration: Registration is CLOSED

     

     

  • PICS Colloquium: Jeff Derby (University of Minnesota)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Jeff Derby, Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science
    Title: Understanding multi-scale phenomena in bulk crystal growth processes via computational modeling: Pushing the continuum from the top down
    Abstract: From a modeling and simulation perspective, crystal growth processes represent some of the most complex and challenging systems ever analyzed, requiring a multidisciplinary and multi-scale approach and drawing on a wide range of scientific and engineering expertise.  This lecture will describe continuum transport processes at play during crystal growth from a mathematical and computational modeling perspective.
    Recent results from research studies will be used to illustrate these modeling concepts.  In particular, we will focus on modeling the interactions of solid particles with a solidification interface, focusing on silicon carbide (SiC) particles in multi-crystalline silicon.  We present a continuum model that allows for a rigorous representation of forces across disparate length scales, ranging from van der Waals interactions arising from atomistic effects to drag forces arising from fluid flow. We demonstrate how this model is able to represent large deformations of the melt-solid interface during the process of engulfing a solid particle that is on the order of 1-10 microns in size.  Of particular interest is the inclusion of a physically motivated, pre-melted liquid layer in the problem formulation. Our finite-element representation permits nanometer-scale resolution of this layer, which, importantly, circumvents the use of arbitrary cut-off values for determining minimum gap thickness prior to particle engulfment. We address the critical factors that determine the transition from the stable pushing of a particle by a solid-melt interface to conditions where engulfment is inevitable.  Of particular interest and relevance is the discovery that oscillating solidification fronts, as would arise due to turbulent fluctuations in large-scale silicon melts, can drive engulfment of silicon carbide particles at average growth rates far below those predicted by prior steady-state analyses. We also address system behavior due to carbon segregation at the solidification front and reaction at the particle surface, which can dramatically alter engulfment behavior.

     

  • PICS Symposium 2016: Emerging Paradigms in Scientific Discovery

    Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall

    Title: "Emerging Paradigms in Scientific Discovery”

    Description: Please join us for a one and one-half day Symposium that focuses on emerging computational and mathematical approaches associated with discovering new mechanisms, constraints, conservation laws, and conceptualizing new theories amidst the landscape of Big Data. This theme touches upon diverse disciplines in health, materials science, biomedical science, marketing/business, and phenomics, which we broadly define as the scene of emergent properties or phenomena across disciplines. 

    Find photos of the event here

  • PICS Colloquium: David Saintillan (UCSD)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: David Saintillan, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
    Title: Confining Active Fluids
    Abstract: Recent experimental studies have shown that confinement can profoundly affect self-organization in semi-dilute active suspensions, leading to striking features such as the formation of steady and spontaneous vortices in circular domains and the emergence of unidirectional pumping motions in periodic racetrack geometries. Motivated by these findings, we analyze the two-dimensional dynamics in confined suspensions of active self-propelled swimmers using a mean-field kinetic theory where conservation equations for the particle configurations are coupled to the forced Navier-Stokes equations for the self-generated fluid flow. In circular domains, a systematic exploration of the parameter space casts light on three distinct states: equilibrium with no flow, stable vortex, and chaotic motion, and the transitions between these are explained and predicted quantitatively using a linearized theory. In periodic racetracks, similar transitions from equilibrium to net pumping to traveling waves to chaos are  observed in agreement with experimental observations and are also explained theoretically. Our results underscore the subtle effects of geometry on the morphology and dynamics of emerging patterns in active suspensions and pave the way for the control of active collective motion in microfluidic devices.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Jonathan Freund (UIUC)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Jonathan Freund, Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Title: Cellular Blood Flow in Small Vessels

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Cameron Abrams (Drexel)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Cameron Abrams, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Drexel University
    Title: TBD

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Jacob Fish (Columbia)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Jacob Fish, Carleton Chaired Professor of Engineering at Columbia University
    Title: Computational Continua

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Gideon Simpson (Drexel)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Gideon Simpson, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Drexel University
    Title: Mathematical Formalisms for Molecular Dynamics

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Dimitris Maroudas (U Mass Amherst)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Dimitris Maroudas, Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Title: Computational Studies of External-Field-Driven Surface Engineering and Optimal Design of Graphene-Based Nanomaterials

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided. 

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Steve Shreve (Carnegie Mellon)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Steve Shreve, Orion Hoch Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University
    Title: A Diffusion Model for Limit-Order Book Evaluation

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • Software Carpentry Workshop

    Towne 225 (Raisler Lounge)

    Instructors: Maneesha Sane, Program Coordinator at Software Carpentry
                        Bryon Smith, Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Michigan

    Description: Software Carpentry’s mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged  to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems. This course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop. You can find a detailed schedule for the workshop here.

    Logistics: You will be required to bring your own computer. Lunch will be provided.

    Registration: The workshop fee is $50 per registrant. This fee can be paid via check, credit card, or Penn account number. Registrants must submit their payment to the Towne Business Office, located in Towne 297. Please contact Laura Neylan, lneylan@seas.upenn.edu, to obtain the Credit Card Payment Authorization Form or the regular Registration Form (for registrants paying via cash or via Penn account). All registrants must also fill out the online form here.

     

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. William Massey (Princeton)

    Speaker: Dr. William Massey, Edwin S. Wilsey Professor of Operations Research and Financial Engineering at Princeton University
    Title: Gaussian Skewness Approximation for Dynamic Rate Multi-Server Queues with Abandonment

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • Python Bootcamp

    Towne 337

    Instructor: Constantine Lignos, Ph.D.

    Description: Python is a great language for getting things done, with an appropriate syntax and simple but powerful standard data structures. In this class, I will introduce the bascis of Python syntax and we'll work through examples of writing programs that can read and write from files, perform basic data analysis, and do some simple simulations or games. The focus will be on writing short programs and working through the bugs you'll run into as a beginning Python programmer. You'll learn to write clean, readable, and fast Python code and how to understasnd the documentation so you can learn new things after the workshop is over and you tackle your own projects.

    Prerequisites:

    1. One or more semesters of undergraduate-level courses in programming in languages such as Java, C, C++, or Perl
    2. Familiarity with data structures such as arrays, linked lists, and hash tables (dictionaries)

    Lunch will be provided on both days. Attendees must bring their own computers.

    Registration is closed.

     

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Hillel Aharoni (Penn)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Hillel Aharoni, post-doctoral researcher at Penn
    Title: Geometry of Thin Nematic Elastomer Sheets

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

     

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium: Dr. Franck Vernerey (Boulder)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Franck Vernerey, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder
    Title: Computational Tissue Engineering: Tuning Tissue Growth with Scaffold Degradation in Enzyme-Sensitive Hydrogels

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium: Dr. Martin Ostoja-Starzewski (UIUC)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Martin Ostoja-Starzeweski, Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering at UIUC
    Title: Violations of Second Law of Thermodynamics vis-a-vis Continuum Mechanics

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium: Dr. Dennis Kochmann (CIT)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Dennis Kochmann, Professor of Aerospace at California Institute of Technology
    Title: From Extreme Materials to Snapping Structures: Taking Advantage of Instability

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium: Dr. Jonathan Weare (University of Chicago)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Jonathan Weare, Professor of Statitics at the University of Chicago
    Title: Understanding Stratification Approaches to Monte Carlo Simulation

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Tony Ladd (University of Florida)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Tony Ladd, Professor of Chemical Engineering at University of Florida
    Title: Pattern Formation in Geological Systems

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • COMSOL Workshop

    Towne 225 (Raisler Lounge)

    Instructor: Vandana Pandian, COMSOL
    Description: This workshop begins with a walk through of COMSOL Multiphysics and its new features, including the Application Builder. Attendees will then have an opportunity to learn about high and low frequency electromagnetics applications within COMSOL. This is the perfect occassion to ask questions and participate in the modeling process. No prior experience is needed. Attendees will receive a free 2 week trial of COMSOL.

    You must bring your own computer and charger. Lunch will be provided.

    See the full schedule for the workshop and register for it here.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Zhaosheng Yu (Zhejiang University)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr Zhaosheng Yu, Professor of Mechancis at Zhejiang University
    Title: A Fictitious Domain Name for Fluid-structure Interactions

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Jin Feng (University of Kansas)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Jin Feng, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Kansas
    Title: A Hamilton-Jacobi Formalism to Large Deviation and Associated Problems

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium Series: Dr. Srikanth Patala (NCSU)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Srikanth Patala, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NCSU
    Title: Local Structural Analysis in Disordered Metallic Systems: Polyhedral Unit Models

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • AMCS/PICS Colloquium: Dr. Nadia Heninger (Penn)

    Towne 337

    Speaker: Dr. Nadia Heninger, Professor of Computer and Information Science at Penn
    Title: Imperfect Forward Secrecy: How Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange Fails in Practice

    Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

  • C/C++ Boot Camp

    Instructor: Christian DeLozier, PhD student in Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania
    Dates: August 29, 2015
    Description: C/C++ are powerful programming languages that give programmers deep control of their computations. However, C/C++ are notoriously hard languages to learn and "easy to shoot yourself in the foot" with. In this class, we will introduce the basics of C and C++: the compilation model, memory safety, low-level object-oriented programming, and the standard library. While you will obviously not be able to master C/C++ in the short span of this course, you will become aware of and gain experience in dealing with the issues that a C/C++ developer faces while writing performance-demanding programs.

  • D^3 Deformation, Defects, Diagnosis

    Presenters: Eduardo Glandt, Erin Grinspun, Ladislav Kavan, Arup Chakraborty, Zachary Ives, Eric Bradlow, George Biros, Christos Davatzikos, Dmitri Chklovskii, Danielle Bassett, Christopher Rycroft, Talid Sinno, Andrea Liu, Stefano Curtarolo, Bryan Chen, Tal Arbel, Joseph Subotnik, Elliot Lipeles
    Date: May 28th and 29th, 2015
    Description: Hosted by PICS and the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, this event is a one-and-one-half day symposium focusing on the computational and mathematical lissues associated with describing the deformation of data sets and ordered strucures and identifying defects within these. This symposium is designed to bring together mathematicians, computer scientists, physical and biological scientists, and engineers from across Penn's campus and the region with intellectual and  research interests in computational science. This symposium is supported by the Provost Interdisciplinary Seminar Fund and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. 

            Program Booklet

  • Interatomic Potentials for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Materials

    Instructors: Judith Harrison and Kathleen Ryan, Chemistry Department, United State Naval Academy
    Date: January 8, 2015
    Description: The first part of this tutorial will address atomistic simulation of materials. We begin with a brief overview of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations - system configurations, ensembles, thermostats, etc. The main part of the tutorial will be a detailed discussion of the factors that enter into the selection of appropriate potential energy functions. Because the dynamics is governed by the potential, careful consideration of the strengths and weaknesses of any given potential in conjunction with the processes that are to be simulated should be undertaken prior to doing MD simulations.  We will discuss several popular potential energy functions, with special attention given to the bond-order potentials, their strengths and weaknesses, and other considerations for making appropriate choices. The second part of this tutorial will be a “hands-on” session using the popular open-source molecular dynamics simulation package LAMMPS from Sandia National Labs. In this part of the tutorial, several sample MD runs will be undertaken. Visualization and analysis techniques will both be discussed and used to obtain the important quantities from sample MD simulations. In addition, we will examine a few instances of how changing the interatomic potential affects the results.

  • R for Humanities

    Instructor: Emil Pitkin, Lecturer and Research Scholar, Department of Statistics, University of Pennsylvania
    Date: December 6 and 7, 2014
    Description: Students and Faculty in the Humanities: Are you interested in learning a computer programming language? Not to become an expert programmer, but simply to learn some basics and to write a bit of code for yourself? R is the leading open source software environment for statistical analysis and visualization, widely admired for its range of application and ease of use. It has become one of the most important tools in the digital humanities, used by literary critics, historians, and others to analyze sets of digitized texts. This weekend bootcamp is your chance to get some experience with coding. The camp is designed to bring total beginners up to a reasonable level of proficiency with R in just two half-day sessions.

  • Python Boot Camp

    Instructor: Constantine Lignos, Post-doctoral researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
    Dates: November 8 and 9, 2014
    Description: Python is a great language for getting things done, with an approachable syntax and simple but powerful standard data structures. In this class, we will introduce the basics of Python syntax and work through examples of performing basic data processing operations in Python. You'll learn to write clean, readable, and fast Python code and how to implement simple algorithms and data processing programs.

  • COMSOL Workshop

    Date: October 21, 2014
    Description: A representative from COMSOL will be on campus to demonstrate the software and lead two specialized sessions concentrating on structural mechanics and heat transfer. The workshop will feature hands-on exercises using COMSOL and includes a free two-week COMSOL trial.

  • Mathematica

    Date: October 13, 2014
    Description: This workshop will feature two hour-long seminars: the first will be a broad overview of the software, and the second will focus on its engineering-specific applications. These seminars will be in a lecture format rather than hands-on exercises. All who are interested (both novice and advanced users) are welcome to attend. 

  • Software Carpentry

    Date: August 21 and 22, 2014
    DescriptionSoftware Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers become more productive by teaching them basic lab skills for computing like program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This two-day hands-on bootcamp will cover basic concepts and tools; participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

  • COMSOL Workshop

    Date: June 20, 2014
    Description: A representative from COMSOL will be on campus to demonstrate the software and lead two specialized sessions concentrating on structural mechanics and heat transfer. The workshop will feature hands-on exercises using COMSOL and includes a free two-week COMSOL trial.

  • C/C++ Boot Camp

    Instructor: Peter-Michael Osera, PhD student in Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania
    Dates: May 17 and 18, 2014
    Description: C/C++ are powerful programming languages that give programmers deep control of their computations. However, C/C++ are notoriously hard languages to learn and "easy to shoot yourself in the foot" with. In this class, we will introduce the basics of C and C++: the compilation model, memory safety, low-level object-oriented programming, and the standard library. While you will obviously not be able to master C/C++ in the short span of this course, you will become aware of and gain experience in dealing with the issues that a C/C++ developer faces while writing performance-demanding programs.

  • MATLAB Boot Camp

    Instructor: Jeremy Magland, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania
    Date: April 12 and 16, 2014
    Description: MATLAB is a standard language for numerical computing. While there are often many ways to program the same algorithm, the choice of the method can greatly impact computational efficiency. Knowledge of the special syntax for vector/matrix/array operations is therefore a critical prerequisite. However we will also focus on how to structure MATLAB programs in a modular, readable, and computationally efficient manner.

  • Python Boot Camp

    Instructor: Constantine Lignos, Post-doctoral researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
    Dates: February 18 and 19, 2014
    Description: Python is a great language for getting things done, with an approachable syntax and simple but powerful standard data structures. In this class, we will introduce the basics of Python syntax and work through examples of performing basic data processing operations in Python. You'll learn to write clean, readable, and fast Python code and how to implement simple algorithms and data processing programs.

  • C/C++ Boot Camp

    Instructor: Peter-Michael Osera, PhD student in Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania
    Dates: January 21 and 22, 2014
    Description: C/C++ are powerful programming languages that give programmers deep control of their computations. However, C/C++ are notoriously hard languages to learn and "easy to shoot yourself in the foot" with. In this class, we will introduce the basics of C and C++: the compilation model, memory safety, low-level object-oriented programming, and the standard library. While you will obviously not be able to master C/C++ in the short span of this course, you will become aware of and gain experience in dealing with the issues that a C/C++ developer faces while writing performance-demanding programs.

  • PICS Kickoff Symposium

    Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall

    October 10, 2013
    9:00 am - 5:00 pm
    Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall
    Reception, 5:00 - 6:30pm, Singh Center for Nanotechnology

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  • C/C++ Boot Camp

    Instructor: Peter-Micharl Osera, PhD student in Computer and Information Science
    Dates: October 5 and 6, 2013
    Description: C/C++ are powerful programming languages that give programmers deep control of their computations. However, C/C++ are notoriously hard languages to learn and "easy to shoot yourself in the foot" with. In this class, we will introduce the basics of C and C++: the compilation model, memory safety, low-level object-oriented programming, and the standard library. While you will obviously not be able to master C/C++ in the short span of this course, you will become aware of and gain experience in dealing with the issues that a C/C++ developer faces while writing performance-demanding programs.